Monday, February 19Serving the aftermarket

Features

Ben – the Four Pillars Challenge

Ben – the Four Pillars Challenge

Charity, Features
Ben, the industry support organisation, offers its services across what it calls the four pillars: Financial, Social, Physical and Mental. For one of their employees, these areas became not just areas of support, but an opportunity for a fundraising endurance challenge. Dave Garrett recently completed a challenge of 4,000 miles during 2017, 1,000 miles for each of the four pillars. “In November 2016, a set of ‘PRIDE’ [Passionate, Respectful, Inclusive, Driven, Empowered] values were launched for all colleagues working at Ben to underpin its mission of making a positive difference to people’s lives,” says Dave. “I was quite new to the organisation at the time and wanted to do my bit to help launch the PRIDE values, so I decided that a personal challenge would best reflect these whils
The future of motoring?

The future of motoring?

Autonomous, Features
A few years ago, the idea of a driverless car was ‘pie in the sky’ thinking, a fad that would never become mainstream. If the words sound familiar, it’s probably because they’ve also been linked to the electric vehicle (EV), hybrid technology, diesel and petrol before it. Manufacturers are taking the idea of autonomous driving very seriously. In fact, the new Audi A8 features ‘Level 3’ autonomy. This means that the car can control itself in certain situations, although the driver must remain alert and prepared to take control at any time. There are five levels, and the interesting stuff begins at Level 4. Therefore, we’re not far away from science-fiction becoming science-fact. Aftermarket choices What does this mean for the aftermarket? Well, in terms of vehicle repair, the need
Diesel – what went wrong?

Diesel – what went wrong?

Diesel, Features, Product features
Until three years ago, diesel was the fuel of choice for drivers. The government backed it, the oil companies backed it and thanks to the complexities of the servicing and intricacies of the parts, the aftermarket backed it. Then, one September morning in 2015, everything changed. During the IAA motor show in Frankfurt, news broke that Volkswagen had been found to be cheating emissions testing in the US, with software fitted to vehicles that could detect when it was being run in a laboratory, and alter the emissions profile accordingly. Therefore, out in the real world, their cars were more polluting that figures showed. The dominoes fell quickly. First, other manufacturers were pointed out, with Renault and Daimler having their offices searched for any evidence of emissions cheating...