Wednesday, November 14Serving the aftermarket

IMI

IMI launches ADAS Accreditation

IMI launches ADAS Accreditation

IMI, News
Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) has contributed to a 38% reduction in accidents, with around 10% of the UK’s car parc featuring some form of windscreen mounted technology. These statistics from Euro NCAP also suggest that 40% of UK vehicles could feature ADAS by 2020. While this technology is certified at manufacture, the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) believes there is room for improvement to ensure that all automotive technicians understand the systems, so that ADAS is properly calibrated after servicing and is safe for use on the road. The body has therefore launched a new IMI ADAS Accreditation to help ensure technicians have the expertise to work with ADAS features in vehicles, protecting the safety of drivers when this technology is activated. The accred
Parents are not aware of automotive apprenticeships says IMI

Parents are not aware of automotive apprenticeships says IMI

IMI, News
New research from the IMI has found that only just over a third (36%) of parents would encourage their child to do an apprenticeship, and more than 1 in 10 think people who choose vocational training are not as clever as those who take an academic route after school. Worryingly, this misconception about the value of apprenticeships has increased since in 2014, despite the government placing greater emphasis on vocational training and university fees rising. n 2014, 7% of respondents to IMI research said they thought those who did apprenticeships were not as clever, and a quarter of parents think if their child does not get a degree they won’t earn as much – an increase from 15% in 2014. With schools across the UK set to return for a new term next week, the IMI’s research has foun
IMI urges roadside and emergency services to be ready for Hybrid and Electric vehicles

IMI urges roadside and emergency services to be ready for Hybrid and Electric vehicles

IMI, News
The Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI), which has been lobbying for the introduction of regulation for vehicle technicians working with electrically-propelled vehicles, believes it is vital that training and accreditation is extended to those dealing with the latest automotive technology at the roadside.  Recent reports of a Tesla Model X, which caught fire after it had been recovered by emergency services, underline the need for industry-led accreditations and qualifications for roadside technicians and emergency services personnel working on EV and hybrid vehicles. The IMI’s recommendations to implement a Licence to Practise for those working on electric and hybrid vehicles now form part of the government’s ‘Road to Zero’ strategy.  And the IMI is urging roadside and emergency
IMI reveals 15% drop in apprenticeships since Levy introduced

IMI reveals 15% drop in apprenticeships since Levy introduced

IMI, News, Training
New research has shown that since the Apprenticeship Levy was launched in April 2017, the total number of starts across all industry sectors has dropped by 61%. This figure also includes a fall of 15% in the automotive industry alone. Such a drop has, according to the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI), caused confusion amongst employers about the new processes, along with reluctance by smaller businesses to take on what they see as an increased administrative burden in the move from older apprenticeship frameworks to the newer models that the levy introduces. When introduced, the Apprenticeship Levy was set at a rate of 0.5% of an employer’s annual payroll. However, only those with a payroll over £3 million would have to make the contribution. Those who do not pay will instea