Monday, September 24Serving the aftermarket

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Hybrid and current PHEVs could be included in 2040 ban

Hybrid and current PHEVs could be included in 2040 ban

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A new media report has suggested the UK ban on internal combustion engines being sold from 2040 onwards may also include many current hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). British magazine Autocar has suggested that the UK Government plan ‘Road to Zero’, which is set to be unveiled imminently, would ban all diesel and petrol vehicles in 2040 as part of a £2.7 billion (€3.1 billion) strategy designed to cut air pollution in the country. When announced in June last year, it was unclear whether any other vehicles other than electric would be part of the ban. The magazine states that now, as part of the Road to Zero plan, all current hybrids, such as the popular Toyota Prius, would also be banned from sale. The rules would state that for a car to be sold as new in the
Vehicle production declines in March as Brexit issues continue

Vehicle production declines in March as Brexit issues continue

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UK vehicle and engine manufacturing fell in the UK during March 2018, as the automotive market suffers from falling sales and the effect of Brexit. Engine production dipped by 3.7% according to figures from the SMMT, as demand from UK car plants fell for a second month. Exports provided a resbite to domestic market challenges, with engines leaving the country up by 4.8% in March, and 12.1% year-to-date. So far, more than 780,000 engines have been built in Britain this year. However, Car production declined in March, with demand falling 13.3% year on year, according to figures. A total of 147,471 cars were built in British factories as the domestic market continued to slow, with demand falling 17.7% in the month. Exports also declined, down 11.9% due to fluctuations in demand i...
Optician council develops prescription windscreens

Optician council develops prescription windscreens

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The UK Optician Society (UKOS) is to move into the UK automotive aftermarket, announcing the development of prescription windscreens for drivers who need to wear glasses behind the wheel. The opticians conducted research amongst its customers and found that those who only need eyewear for distance did not like wearing it just for driving, causing a risk for other motorists. Keen to take a stand on safety, the body engaged the help of the Automotive Product Research Institute of London to develop a solution that would make these motorists happy while improving their vision of the road ahead. Their solution is the Fully Optical OverLay, which is applied to a windscreen prior to fitting to a vehicle. Drivers will need a full new front glass panel which can be fitted by any window fi